Improved tilapia seed arrives in Myanmar

In Myanmar, aquaculture is capable of generating higher farm incomes than almost any other form of agriculture, making it an attractive option for rural farm households.

Currently, more than 200,000 people are engaged in aquaculture, with the indigenous carp, rohu, representing 70% of production. Yet production of the fast-growing and hardy tilapia species is low, despite its ability to adapt to diverse environments, which makes it ideal for small and medium-scale fish farmers in developing countries.

WorldFish in Zambia

WorldFish focuses on testing technologies that improve the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture and strengthen value chains to increase incomes of fishdependent people in Zambia and throughout sub-Saharan Africa. WorldFish works in the Barotse Floodplain of western Zambia where its research focuses on testing improved fish processing technologies and social innovations to reduce post-harvest losses and improve gender relations throughout the fishery value chain.

WorldFish in Egypt

Since launching its research program in Egypt in 1998, WorldFish has delivered high quality, practical research related to the country’s aquaculture and fishery sector. A key research focus has been on improving fish genetics to transform Egypt into a role model for African aquaculture development. WorldFish works closely with aquaculture stakeholders, the private sector and government organizations to deliver research on increasing aquaculture productivity, increasing the flow-on benefits of fish farming to women and youth, and enhancing fish value chains.

Tilapia lake virus (TiLV): What to know and do? (Bangla version)

Tilapia lake virus is a newly emerging virus that is associated with significant mortalities in farmed tilapia. With cases reported across Africa, Asia and South America, the virus represents a huge risk to the global tilapia industry, whose 2015 production was valued at USD 9.8 billion. All countries with a tilapia industry must be vigilant and act quickly to investigate cases of mortalities in farms.

Tilapia lake virus (TiLV): What to know and do?

Tilapia lake virus is a newly emerging virus that is associated with significant mortalities in farmed tilapia. With cases reported across Africa, Asia and South America, the virus represents a huge risk to the global tilapia industry, whose 2015 production was valued at USD 9.8 billion. All countries with a tilapia industry must be vigilant and act quickly to investigate cases of mortalities in farms.

Tilapia lake virus (TiLV): Literature review

Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) is an emerging infectious agent that has recently been identified in diseased tilapia on three continents. At the time of writing, scientific publications have reported TiLV in samples collected from Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, Israel and Thailand. While the link between TiLV and disease outbreaks in Israel and Thailand are well documented, further investigations are being undertaken to determine the significance of TiLV in the other countries.

Tilapia lake virus: a threat to the global tilapia industry?

Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) is a recently described virus affecting wild and farmedtilapines. At present, it has been reported on three continents (Asia, Africa andSouth America) and the number of countries where the agent has been detected islikely to increase rapidly as a result of increased awareness, surveillance and avail-ability of diagnostic methods. Any lack of openness regarding the TiLV status of atranslocating live tilapia population destined for aquaculture may inadvertentlycontribute to the spread of the agent.

Social dynamics shaping the diffusion of sustainable aquaculture innovations in the Solomon Island

Sustainably feeding the world’s growing population represents one of our most significant challenges. Aquaculture is well positioned to make contributions towards this challenge. Yet, the translation of aquaculture production innovations into benefits for rural communities is constrained by a limited understanding of the social dynamics that influence the adoption of new agricultural practices. In this paper, we investigate the factors that shape the spread of small-scale tilapia aquaculture through rural Solomon Islands.

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