Improved tilapia seed arrives in Myanmar

In Myanmar, aquaculture is capable of generating higher farm incomes than almost any other form of agriculture, making it an attractive option for rural farm households.

Currently, more than 200,000 people are engaged in aquaculture, with the indigenous carp, rohu, representing 70% of production. Yet production of the fast-growing and hardy tilapia species is low, despite its ability to adapt to diverse environments, which makes it ideal for small and medium-scale fish farmers in developing countries.

WorldFish in Tanzania

Fisheries are an important source of food, income and nutrition in Tanzania, where 25% of the country’s population depends on coastal resources or inland lakes for their livelihoods. Over 180,000 people are employed in the fisheries sector, with a further 19,223 people involved in fish farming. WorldFish is working with the Tanzanian government and development partners to increase aquaculture production, reduce postharvest fish losses and enhance the role of fish in nutrition.

Pond polyculture technologies combat micronutrient deficiencies and increase household income in Bangladesh

Two sustainable, low-cost pond polyculture technologies have been developed to culture carps and mola in ponds, and culture carps and mola in ponds connected to rice fields. These technologies can increase total fish production from ponds. Farmers depend on carps as an income source, and mola is rich in micronutrients that can help to meet the nutritional requirements of the rural poor, particularly women and young children.

Measuring individual feed efficiency and its correlations with performance traits in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

Estimating individual feed intake of fish held in groups has long been a challenge precluding precise knowledge of the individual variation of feed efficiency (FE) in fish. In this study, counts of the number of feed pellets (1.63 mg on average) eaten by individual tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) held in 8 mixed sex groups of 15 fish were measured from video recordings made over a period of 10 days where fish were fed twice daily to achieve compensatory growth after 10 days of fasting.

Integration of mapping and socio-economic status of cage culture: Towards balancing lake-use and culture fisheries in Lake Victoria, Kenya

The present study aimed to map the presence of cages and to profile the socio-economic characteristics of their owners in Lake Victoria Basin Kenya as baseline information to aid in the formation of policies to manage the integration of capture and culture fisheries.

The impacts of integrated homestead pond-dike systems in relation to production, consumption and seasonality in central north Bangladesh

The roles of homestead ponds and surrounding dike production of vegetables on farms in peri-urban and rural communities in central north Bangladesh were assessed. The study supports the view that small homestead ponds can contribute to the wider food supply, and that such “quasi-peasant” forms of aquaculture contribute to reduced poverty and enhanced dietary diversity and food security in the broader population.

Identification of Tilapia Lake Virus in Egypt in Nile tilapia affected by ‘summer mortality’ syndrome

Egyptian fish farms have faced unexplained mortality of tilapia during the summer months in recent years. Epidemiological surveys indicated that 37% of fish farms were affected in 2015 with an average mortality rate of 9.2% and a potential economic impact of around US$ 100 million. Despite a number of researchers and organizations investigating potential causes results so far have been inconclusive. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of various production factors on the incidence of disease outbreaks in Egyptian pond based aquaculture.

Basic biosecurity manual for tilapia hatchery technicians in Bangladesh

With the onset of Tilapia Lake Virus (TiLV) outbreaks in several Asian countries, WorldFish, in collaboration with Bangladesh’s Department of Fisheries, has developed a program to improve biosecurity in the tilapia industry throughout the country. As the first step, a training program has been designed and conducted to train a group of specialists called Master Trainers on improving tilapia hatchery biosecurity. This manual is a result of that program.

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