Improved tilapia seed arrives in Myanmar

In Myanmar, aquaculture is capable of generating higher farm incomes than almost any other form of agriculture, making it an attractive option for rural farm households.

Currently, more than 200,000 people are engaged in aquaculture, with the indigenous carp, rohu, representing 70% of production. Yet production of the fast-growing and hardy tilapia species is low, despite its ability to adapt to diverse environments, which makes it ideal for small and medium-scale fish farmers in developing countries.

WorldFish in Malawi

Since 1987, WorldFish has been working with the Malawi Government, universities and development partners to create a more productive fisheries sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security. Past efforts have included developing improved aquaculture technologies, implementing holistic ecosystem approaches to fisheries management, supporting the creation of improved fisheries policies, and providing scientific training to partners in Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia.

Women’s empowerment in aquaculture: Two case studies from Indonesia

Indonesia is one of the top ten aquaculture-producing countries globally. The sector makes a significant contribution to the country’s development. Women are engaged in a range of aquaculture production and value chain activities in Indonesia. In particular, women are predominate in marketing and processing. Despite this, there is currently a lack of information regarding women’s roles – and more fundamentally – the outcomes for women and factors that enable or constrain these. This represents a critical gap in the knowledge needed for effective aquaculture programmes and policies.

Women’s empowerment in aquaculture: Two case studies from Bangladesh

Bangladesh is a global leader in inland fish production and has been ranked as the fifth largest producer of aquaculture food fish in the world. The fisheries sector, including aquaculture, provides employment to 17.8 million people, out of which women constitute 1.4 million. The shrimp industry alone employs over one million people in its processing factories, out of which 88.64 percent are women. While women play a significant role in aquaculture production in Bangladesh, their contributions remain under-reported.

Women's empowerment in aquaculture in Bangladesh and Indonesia: Insights from four case studies

This factsheet contributes to FAO Organizational Strategic Objective 1 "Eradicate hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition", Strategic Objective 2 "Increase and improve provision of goods and services from agriculture, forestry and fisheries in a sustainable manner", and Strategic Objective 3 "Reduce rural poverty".

Who says women can’t fish? Stories of successful women farmers in Bangladesh and Nepal

This booklet present several stories of women in rural Bangladesh and Nepal who are making positive changes in their communities. The stories have been collected from a variety of projects WorldFish has been implementing over the past nine years with support from partners and donors. These inspirational women have undertaken new agriculture-aquaculture livelihood opportunities to better their lives and those of their family members. To get where they are now, these women have had to overcome many challenges.

Toward more inclusive and sustainable development of Zambian aquaculture

This policy brief presents an overview of the aquaculture sector in Zambia. It describes opportunities and approaches for sustainable aquaculture development and exemplifies the importance of aquaculture in meeting development challenges, including the contribution to economic growth, alleviating poverty, and addressing food and nutrition security for improved public health outcomes.

STREAMS program brochure

The Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture Market System The Sustainable Transformation of Egypt’s Aquaculture Market System (STREAMS) project aims to increase production of inexpensive, nutritious and safe fish from sustainable aquaculture systems to help improve the health and nutrition of Egypt’s resource-poor while creating employment and increasing incomes along the aquaculture value chain.

Social dynamics shaping the diffusion of sustainable aquaculture innovations in the Solomon Island

Sustainably feeding the world’s growing population represents one of our most significant challenges. Aquaculture is well positioned to make contributions towards this challenge. Yet, the translation of aquaculture production innovations into benefits for rural communities is constrained by a limited understanding of the social dynamics that influence the adoption of new agricultural practices. In this paper, we investigate the factors that shape the spread of small-scale tilapia aquaculture through rural Solomon Islands.

Promoting the sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar to improve food Security and income for communities in the Ayeyarwady Delta and Central Dry Zone (MYFC)

MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Small-scale aquaculture