WorldFish in Tanzania

Fisheries are an important source of food, income and nutrition in Tanzania, where 25% of the country’s population depends on coastal resources or inland lakes for their livelihoods. Over 180,000 people are employed in the fisheries sector, with a further 19,223 people involved in fish farming. WorldFish is working with the Tanzanian government and development partners to increase aquaculture production, reduce postharvest fish losses and enhance the role of fish in nutrition.

Utility of river training structures and present status in Patuakhali District Bangladesh

The focus of this study was to know usefulness of river training structures, controlling hydro-morphological characteristics, socio-economic benefits of inhabitants and current situation of these structures in Patuakhali District. Evaluations were measured on hydro-morphological features of rivers, protection safety based on utility of structures, environmental and social benefits by spot visit, face to face interview and focus group discussion methods. Ten different river side location of Patuakhali District during July-Sep in 2015.

Uncovering human social networks in coping with Lake Chilwa recessions in Malawi

This paper provides an in-depth understanding of social dynamics in the form of kinship ties in matrilineal societies. It unpacks gender roles and relationships at the community level to understand how social structures, created by the pattern of relations, enhance or hinder coping initiatives during lake recessions in the Lake Chilwa socio-ecological system.

Sustainable intensification in smallholder agriculture: An integrated systems research approach

Sustainable intensification has recently been developed and adopted as a key concept and driver for research and policy in sustainable agriculture. It includes ecological, economic and social dimensions, where food and nutrition security, gender and equity are crucial components. This book describes different aspects of systems research in agriculture in its broadest sense, where the focus is moved from farming systems to livelihoods systems.

The 'seafood gap' in the food-water nexus literature--issues surrounding freshwater use in seafood production chains

Freshwater use for food production is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades with population growth, changing demographics, and shifting diets. Ensuring joint food-water security has prompted efforts to quantify freshwater use for different food products and production methods. However, few analyses quantify freshwater use for seafood production, and those that do use inconsistent water accounting. This inhibits water use comparisons among seafood products or between seafood and agricultural/livestock products.

Redefining community based on place attachment in a connected world

The concept of community is often used in environmental policy to foster environmental stewardship and public participation, crucial prerequisites of effective management. However, prevailing conceptualizations of community based on residential location or resource use are limited with respect to their utility as surrogates for communities of shared environment-related interests, and because of the localist perspective they entail.

Measuring gender-transformative change: A review of literature and promising practices

Gender-transformative approaches aim to move beyond individual self-improvement among women and toward transforming the power dynamics and structures that serve to reinforce gendered inequalities. As defined by the CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS), a gender-transformative approach to development goes beyond the "symptoms" of gender inequality to address "the social norms, attitudes, behaviors, and social systems that underlie them".

The importance of qualitative social research for effective fisheries management

Over recent decades it has become widely accepted that managing fisheries resources means managing human behaviour, and so understanding social and economic dynamics is just as important as understanding species biology and ecology. Until recently, fisheries managers and researchers have struggled to develop effective methods and data for social and economic analysis that can integrate with the predominantly biological approaches to fisheries management. The field is now growing fast, however, and globally, researchers are developing and testing new methods.

How is innovation in aquaculture conceptualized and managed? A systematic literature review and reflection framework to inform analysis and action

Aquaculture has experienced spectacular growth in the past decades, during which continuous innovation has played a significant role, but it faces increasing criticism regarding its ecological and social sustainability practices and the resulting challenges for future innovation processes. However, in the aquaculture literature, there is limited systematic knowledge of how innovation has been approached in terms of how the focus and the scope of aquaculture innovation processes are understood and managed.

How do hunter-gatherers learn? The transmission of indigenous knowledge among the Agta of the Philippines

The Agta of the Philippines depend on extensive knowledge of their natural environment for their livelihoods. However, little is known about the transmission of this indigenous ecological knowledge. This paper examines the transmission of knowledge on hunting, fishing and gathering among the Agta in San Mariano, Isabela Province. We used observation, interviewing and knowledge tests as methods of inquiry. Our results show that knowledge transmission happens on-site, is gender-specific and that pathways of knowledge transmission differ per livelihood activity.

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