WorldFish in Zambia

WorldFish focuses on testing technologies that improve the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture and strengthen value chains to increase incomes of fishdependent people in Zambia and throughout sub-Saharan Africa. WorldFish works in the Barotse Floodplain of western Zambia where its research focuses on testing improved fish processing technologies and social innovations to reduce post-harvest losses and improve gender relations throughout the fishery value chain.

WorldFish in Myanmar

WorldFish is working with the Myanmar Government and other partners to create a policy environment to improve fisheries management and capture more economic, social and environmental benefits for the long term. The WorldFish integrated research and development program is endorsed by the government and seeks to unlock the potential for growth in aquaculture, for example in the many household ponds in the Ayeyarwady Delta, Central Dry Zone, Shan State and Sagaing Region. Scaling-up smallholder aquaculture can bring benefits such as better incomes, nutrition and health.

WorldFish in Malawi

Since 1987, WorldFish has been working with the Malawi Government, universities and development partners to create a more productive fisheries sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security. Past efforts have included developing improved aquaculture technologies, implementing holistic ecosystem approaches to fisheries management, supporting the creation of improved fisheries policies, and providing scientific training to partners in Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia.

WorldFish in Bangladesh

Since 1989, WorldFish has been working with the Bangladesh Government and development partners to create a more productive fisheries and aquaculture sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security.

Promoting the sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar to improve food Security and income for communities in the Ayeyarwady Delta and Central Dry Zone (MYFC)

MYFC, a Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) funded project, aims to promote sustainable growth of aquaculture in Myanmar. By introducing low cost poly-culture combining small indigenous species of fish with mostly carps, the project intends to increase income, food and nutrition security for resource-poor households in the Ayeyarwady Delta and the central dry zone (CDZ). With a particular focus on women and children, and running over three years (2016-2018), MYFC will target four townships in each area.

The potential of nutrient-rich small fish species in aquaculture to improve human nutrition and health

Small fish are a common food and an integral part of the everyday carbohydraterich diets of many population groups in poor countries. These populations also suffer from undernutrition, including micronutrient deficiencies – the hidden hunger. Small fish species, as well as the little oil, vegetables and spices with which they are cooked enhance diet diversity. Small fish are a rich source of animal protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals.

Pond polyculture technologies combat micronutrient deficiencies and increase household income in Bangladesh

Two sustainable, low-cost pond polyculture technologies have been developed to culture carps and mola in ponds, and culture carps and mola in ponds connected to rice fields. These technologies can increase total fish production from ponds. Farmers depend on carps as an income source, and mola is rich in micronutrients that can help to meet the nutritional requirements of the rural poor, particularly women and young children.

Payments for hilsa fish (Tenualosa ilisha) conservation in Bangladesh

Hilsa was once abundantly available in the 100 rivers of Bangladesh. Fishermen used to catch plenty of hilsa which were sold fresh to the local and urban markets. It was a cheap fish and was affordable even to the poor. However, its population has declined significantly over the last 30 years. Such a decline in catches prompted the government of Bangladesh to declare four sites in the country's coastal rivers as hilsa sanctuaries restricting fishing during the breeding season.

Measuring nutritional quality of agricultural production systems: Application to fish production

Reorienting food systems towards improving nutrition outcomes is vital if the global goal of ending all forms of malnutrition is to be achieved. Crucial to transitioning to nutrition-sensitive agriculture is valuing and measuring nutritional quality of the outputs of agricultural production. We review existing indicators which capture an element of nutritional quality applicable to different stages of the food and nutrition system. Applying relevant indicators from the agricultural production stage to selected aquaculture systems, we compare and contrast their strengths and limitations.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Nutrition