WorldFish in Zambia

WorldFish focuses on testing technologies that improve the productivity of fisheries and aquaculture and strengthen value chains to increase incomes of fishdependent people in Zambia and throughout sub-Saharan Africa. WorldFish works in the Barotse Floodplain of western Zambia where its research focuses on testing improved fish processing technologies and social innovations to reduce post-harvest losses and improve gender relations throughout the fishery value chain.

WorldFish in Tanzania

Fisheries are an important source of food, income and nutrition in Tanzania, where 25% of the country’s population depends on coastal resources or inland lakes for their livelihoods. Over 180,000 people are employed in the fisheries sector, with a further 19,223 people involved in fish farming. WorldFish is working with the Tanzanian government and development partners to increase aquaculture production, reduce postharvest fish losses and enhance the role of fish in nutrition.

WorldFish in Nigeria

WorldFish has a long history of working in Africa, including in nearby Ghana and Cameroon, to strengthen the continent’s aquaculture sector by conducting research and providing training. WorldFish aims to harness this experience, combined with its expertise in fish genetics, to boost aquaculture productivity and enhance nutrition and food security in Nigeria. WorldFish will draw on its involvement and support from the African Union InterAfrican Bureau of Animal Resources to deliver this work.

WorldFish in Myanmar

WorldFish is working with the Myanmar Government and other partners to create a policy environment to improve fisheries management and capture more economic, social and environmental benefits for the long term. The WorldFish integrated research and development program is endorsed by the government and seeks to unlock the potential for growth in aquaculture, for example in the many household ponds in the Ayeyarwady Delta, Central Dry Zone, Shan State and Sagaing Region. Scaling-up smallholder aquaculture can bring benefits such as better incomes, nutrition and health.

WorldFish in Egypt

Since launching its research program in Egypt in 1998, WorldFish has delivered high quality, practical research related to the country’s aquaculture and fishery sector. A key research focus has been on improving fish genetics to transform Egypt into a role model for African aquaculture development. WorldFish works closely with aquaculture stakeholders, the private sector and government organizations to deliver research on increasing aquaculture productivity, increasing the flow-on benefits of fish farming to women and youth, and enhancing fish value chains.

WorldFish in Bangladesh

Since 1989, WorldFish has been working with the Bangladesh Government and development partners to create a more productive fisheries and aquaculture sector that contributes to diversified and resilient rural livelihoods and promotes food and nutrition security.

Unpacking factors influencing antimicrobial use in global aquaculture and their implication for management: a review from a systems perspective

Global seafood provides almost 20% of all animal protein in diets, and aquaculture is, despite weakening trends, the fastest growing food sector worldwide. Recent increases in production have largely been achieved through intensification of existing farming systems, resulting in higher risks of disease outbreaks.

Toward more inclusive and sustainable development of Zambian aquaculture

This policy brief presents an overview of the aquaculture sector in Zambia. It describes opportunities and approaches for sustainable aquaculture development and exemplifies the importance of aquaculture in meeting development challenges, including the contribution to economic growth, alleviating poverty, and addressing food and nutrition security for improved public health outcomes.

Timor-Leste national aquaculture development strategy 2012-2030

The Timor-Leste National Aquaculture Development Strategy (2012–2030) provides a framework for future responsible development of the aquaculture sector in the country. The strategy is anchored to the underlying principles of combating widespread poverty and malnutrition and for effective ecosystem management in the country. The development of the National Aquaculture Strategy involved consultation meetings with agro-ecological, social, economic, and institutional aspects.

The 'seafood gap' in the food-water nexus literature--issues surrounding freshwater use in seafood production chains

Freshwater use for food production is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades with population growth, changing demographics, and shifting diets. Ensuring joint food-water security has prompted efforts to quantify freshwater use for different food products and production methods. However, few analyses quantify freshwater use for seafood production, and those that do use inconsistent water accounting. This inhibits water use comparisons among seafood products or between seafood and agricultural/livestock products.

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